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Fly Press

The W. G. Goetz & Sons Fly Press in the photos below is believed to have been owned by what was the Bendigo Ordnance Factory and later, Hofmann Engineering.

The Bendigo Ordnance Factory began in 1942 to produce heavy artillery and naval guns. Around May 1989, Australian Defense Industries was created as a government-owned corporation, which took over the operations of major Australian government owned defense facilities including those at Bendigo.

As part of the plan to eventually privatise the industry, around 1999-2001 the Australian government enacted plans to sell ADI. The successful bid was that of the joint venture between Transfield and French group Thomson-CSF.

Thomson-CSF became known as Thales in December 2000 following its takeover of UK defense electronics group Racal Electronics.

By 2006, Thales increased what was its 50% share in ADI to full ownership. ADI became Thales Australia.

During 2010, Hofmann Engineering, who it seems had the Fly Press shown here, acquired 5 hectares of the Bendigo site from Thales Australia, including workshops.

Thanks to Michael for the photos. Click on an image below for a larger version

Canteen, parties and Christmas

Some photos supplied by Ray Pond, whose father Ernie was a Goetz employee. Dates unknown except where noted. If anyone has any info to share, please leave a comment!

Click images below for larger versions.

Ernie Pond as Santa. Text on the rear of the photo indicates that the photo was professionally taken:
‘A Candid Photograph by Raymond Mudford, .. Forrest Street Sunshine’.

 

Altona, 29 November 1981 – possibly a Goetz Christmas party

5 September 1975 – during a Goetz dinner perhaps?

 

Buffalo Forge Company – W. G. Goetz & Sons Ltd.

Here’s a photo of a metal plaque attached to an unknown machine made by W. G. Goetz & Sons Ltd. under licence from the Buffalo Forge Company, USA.

The ‘Ltd’ on the plaque indicates a date after April 1939, when W. G. Goetz & Sons Pty. Ltd. became a public company, dropping the ‘Pty.’ from its name.

If you know what it might have been attached to or have more info, please leave a comment!

130mm x 105mm. Click image for larger view

Promotional Brochure 1996

Frustratingly, most Goetz catalogues and promotional material did not include a publication date, but a clue in this comb-bound publicity brouchure saying that W. G. Goetz & Sons Ltd had “Over 121 years service to industry”, places the brochure at or shortly after 1996. The brochure lists various services provided by both W. G. Goetz & Sons Ltd and Goetz Manufacturing Pty. Ltd.

Click the thumbnail image below or here to download the brochure as a PDF 1.2 Mb

 

5 Years Service – coasters

Goetz employees were given a memento of their first five years service in the form of a set of six square metallic coasters, each 95mm x 95mm.

The coasters shown below were given to Terence Linehan, who worked at Goetz as an engineering pattern maker from 1969 to 1982.

The coasters were “Designed and Crafted” by Paul Stephen-Daly, trading as Louchrilau Nominees P/L of Malvern. The company was known for producing limited edition and custom metallic drink coasters, including a souvenir drink coaster to help publicise the Phar Lap movie in 1983. An example is held at Museum Victoria as part of the Phar Lap collection.

Between August and December 1992 Paul Stephen-Daly also registered designs with Intellectual Property Australia for a bottle rack, bottle rack/trophy and a presentation wall plaque trophy.

The company received various government export and expansion grants during the 1970s and 1980s, however, according to Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, Business (National : 1987 – 2004), the company was deregistered and dissolved as of 4th August 1990.

Thanks to Terence’s daughter Robyn for the coasters. Click images below for larger views

Goetz Sign, Hall Street

The Geotz sign used to sit proudly high up on the workshops wall at the Hall Street end of the saw-tooth roof, as seen in the 1963 photo below. Following demolition of the workshops in 2008, the sign was relocated to its present location above the roof of the remaining brick building along Hall Street. The remaining former office complex building has a Heritage Overlay, which hopefully includes the sign. For details of the Heritage Overlay, see this PDF, p.33

Aerial view of the Hall Street works showing the sign in its original position, from a 1963 catalogue.
Click image for larger view

 

The sign in 2015, looking weather-worn and a bit shabby.
Click image for larger view

 

Re-drawn version of the sign with best guess as to the original colours.
Click image for larger view

Demolition 2008

The main workshops were demolished in 2008 to make way for new buildings that are now a small industrial estate. The original brick office building along Hall Street remains, now home to a number of businesses including a craft brewery. Perhaps as part of the Heritage Overlay on the building, the Goetz sign has been retained.

 

The photos in the gallery below were taken around June 2008 by Melbourne writer Vin Maskell, originally posted in his blog entry The Goetz engineering sign. Reproduced here by permission. Thanks Vin!

The photos in the gallery below were taken around May 2008, kindly supplied by Ron Collins.